Lowestoft Chronicle is an online literary magazine published quarterly, accepting fiction, poetry, and creative non-fiction. Preference is given to humorous submissions with an emphasis on travel.
Check out our latest issue.

Lowestoft Chronicle Press publishes a print anthology of the best pieces annually. The next anthology will be published in 2017. Check our News page for more details on our next anthology.

Home  |  Latest issue  |  Submissions  |  About  |  Shop  |  News  |  Reviews  |  Archive

Reviews of Lowestoft Chronicle

REVIEWS OF LOWESTOFT CHRONICLE

"The much-admired Lowestoft Chronicle, an eclectic and innovative online journal of new writing focusing on travel and humour, [offers] a mouth-watering feast of short stories, poems, narrative non-fiction, and in-depth interviews with acclaimed authors. This vibrant literary forum is the brainchild of author and editor Nicholas Litchfield, an English-born librarian who lives in Western New York. Packed into the pages are stories to entice, enthral, and entertain…incisive and enlightening interviews…[and] a tasty blend of pleasing and deftly prepared poems."
Lancashire Evening Post

"A tip of the hat (sombrero, fez) to Lowestoft Chronicle for fueling our urge to turn off Jersey Shore, toss our cell phones into a lake, and go embrace this amazing planet of ours. Bon Voyage!"
— Franz Wisner, The New York Times bestselling author of Honeymoon with My Brother and How the World Makes Love

"All things considered, it might just be a very good thing if the Lowestoft Chronicle were to achieve their goal of world domination. Best wishes to them!"
— Cheryl LaGuardia, E-Views, Library Journal

"It's unique and the quality of the writing is amazingly high."
— Luke Rhinehart, internationally bestselling author of the cult classic The Dice Man

"Lowestoft Chronicle presents entertaining and exciting stories that lend themselves toward travel without dipping completely over into travel writing."
Newpages.com

"How did I not know about the Lowestoft Chronicle? If you're late to this travel and literary parade as well, check out Nicholas Litchfield's superb online journal specializing in all things to do with travel, literature, and the overlap between these life-nourishing activities."
— James R. Benn, acclaimed author of the Billy Boyle World War II mystery series

"I was extremely impressed, after reading it, with the variety and quality of the writing …there's something here for everyone. Take a few minutes to visit the website and have a look around, maybe donate a couple bucks if you like what you see. If you're a writer and you have some great travel-themed work, visit the online site and support the magazine by submitting your work and spreading the word to your friends and family."
— Frank Mundo, Examiner.com

"I'm delighted that a place exists for this kind of travel writing. Nicholas Litchfield has put together something very special, something to celebrate, enjoy, savor."
— Jay Parini, internationally bestselling author of The Last Station and The Passages of H.M.

"The world may be shrinking, but it's sure not growing any less strange. That's what we learn from Lowestoft Chronicle — the literary equivalent of Rick's Café in Casablanca, where travelers of all stripes pull up a stool and swap stories at the bar. Handsomely designed and expertly curated, Lowestoft Chronicle drives us into the arms of experience."
— Scott Dominic Carpenter, acclaimed author of Theory of Remainders

"Something to check out when you just want to read. I used to read a lot of literary magazines. Wonderful little collections of short stories and essays that you could only find in bookstores that felt like home. It wasn't until I ran across lowestoftchronicle.com that I realized just how long it has been. The Lowestoft Chronicle gets around both problems … they even have a print version. It's worth a look for fans of short stories, creative non-fiction and poetry."
— Dave Dempsey in Today's Webtip segment of Radio FM4

"If you're interested in literary fiction, I highly recommend the Lowestoft Chronicle, the excellent on-line literary magazine founded and edited by Nicholas Litchfield. The overall theme of the magazine is travel, but that's a pretty broad subject area, as the wide variety of pieces in this handsome [magazine] proves."
— James Reasoner, Rough Edges

"The Lowestoft Chronicle is both classy and fun to read. A work accomplished by careful attention to detail and quality."
— Sheldon Russell, acclaimed author of the Hook Runyon mystery series

"Full of great talent and exceptionally well written pieces. An entertaining read."
— Tara Smith, The Review Review (5-Star Review)

"I'm always impressed with the quarterly online literary magazine, Lowestoft Chronicle — it's filled with intriguing fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and interviews. Click on over for good reading."
— Matthew P. Mayo, Spur Award-winning author of Tucker's Reckoning

"Lowestoft Chronicle is a standout among a growing universe of online journals. Every issue delivers a cornucopia of entertaining and thought-provoking stories and articles."
— Michael C. Keith, author of the acclaimed memoir The Next Better Place: A Father and Son on the Road

"Armchair travelers, rejoice! Filled with fiction, nonfiction and poetry about travel and destinations, Lowestoft Chronicle brings the far corners of the world to the reader's armchair. The stories and poems vary in tone from dead serious to delightful whimsy, offering something for every taste."
— Mary Beth Magee, Examiner.com

"Lowestoft Chronicle is contemporary and worldly but with a sepia charm. It's a Baedeker for the vicarious traveler in the age of globalization. Thanks so much for inviting me along."
— Ivy Goodman, Lowestoft Chronicle contributor and author of the short story collections Heart Failure and A Chapter from Her Upbringing

"One of the fascinating things about this particular publication is that the editors do not compromise the integrity of the journal and what they decide to publish. Because the journal is not limited by space or affordability the way a printed journal might be, Lowestoft Chronicle publishes just the right amount of work to be relevant and hard-hitting. I expect this journal to be around for quite a while longer."
— Krystal Sierra, The Review Review (5-Star Review)

"Reading Lowestoft Chronicle is like jostling through a sprawling bazaar in Tashkent or Ulaanbaatar, with eyes wide open and wits on high alert. Invigorating, too."
— Victor Robert Lee, author of Performance Anomalies

"Lowestoft Chronicle is a superb lit mag. It offers the kind of perceptive, humorous writing that we like here at TCR."
The Committee Room

"Lowestoft Chronicle is a wonderful new addition to the world of creative writing."
— Tony Perrottet, acclaimed travel writer and author of The Sinner's Grand Tour, Off the Deep End, Pagan Holiday, The Naked Olympics, and Napoleon's Privates

"In this quarterly, you'll find creative nonfiction, short stories, and a few poems, with a welcome dose of humor in many. Try 'People-Watching in the Galápagos Islands.' Wander around the site and you'll find intriguing stories."
— Pat Tompkins, Afar.com

"Poems such as Laury Egan's 'Point No Point' and John Grey's 'This Lack of Maps' show a journal that chooses poetry with keen regard to the specificity and the ache of place."
— Barth Landor, author of A Week in Winter

On Grand Departures (Lowestoft Chronicle's 2016 Anthology)

"The stories, poems, and essays in Nicholas Litchfield's latest anthology, Grand Departures, are haunting, idiosyncratic, and unexpected, like the true delights of travel."
— Ivy Goodman, award-winning author of Heart Failure and A Chapter from Her Upbringing

"A father putting his life on the line searching for his daughter in the swamps of Florida, a girlfriend who finds her soul mate on a butte in the Badlands, a wife who tolerates her husband's eccentricities in Vatican City, and a writer and his agent traveling from one bizarre topic to another to find the perfect, next thing in literature. These are only a smattering of the poignant and funny stories, memoirs, and poems found in this must-have collection of travelers' delights and demons."
— Nancy Caronia, contributor to Somewhere, Sometime and co-editor of Personal Effects

"Part the beaded curtain to enter worlds both strange and exhilarating, places where men bite parrots, fruit venders immolate themselves and turbaned cab drivers weep at the tragedy of 9/11. The aromas of cumin and coriander, mint and cilantro waft through this impressive collection of travel works that sweeps the reader across the globe, into marble villages and pueblos pulsing with fire and drums, caves in which monks press champagne grapes into wine, and badlands where bighorn sheep clack along rocky outcrops. The characters here, though sometimes lost in distant lands and curious customs, never fail to be lost in wonder. Here is your ticket to travel with them, to lose yourself in these pages, to satisfy your inner nomad."
— Dorene O'Brien, award-winning author of Voices of the Lost and Found

On Lowestoft Chronicle Issue 26

"Lowestoft Chronicle publishes some of the finest work of travel writing on the Internet today. Yours truly had been assigned to review Summer, Issue 26, and I found that I wanted to tell all of my friends about it. The pieces, specifically works of fiction and nonfiction, are captivating. Enamored by this work is not the appropriate way to describe my experience — I was enthralled by the work, by the control in narrative each of the contributors have. I was compelled to read each of the pieces from the first word to the last. Like a new lover, Lowestoft Chronicle fascinated me more times over than I anticipated, and I believe that it is something the journal aims for and will continue to do. My favorite piece, Peter Marsh's "There was a Knock," follows the story of murder and betrayal, what one would consider classic noir. The story itself is told in sharp dialogue, the existence of formalities between the hired and the hire-e a testament to the differences among cultures. Another story I particularly liked has to do with the way in which the definitiveness between reality and virtual reality becomes lost. The speaker of "Virtuality" (Ivy Goodman) becomes disoriented, fearful, and trapped in virtual Eyre when the virtual world begins to resemble his own...The end, left unresolved, leaves us with a nightmarish feeling, the feeling that we, like the speaker, might not wake from a terrible dream."
— Krystal Sierra, The Review Review (5-Star Review)

On Lowestoft Chronicle Issue 24

"I'm enjoying the latest issue of Lowestoft Chronicle. Tina Koenig's essay is a hoot (I must have a close look next time I get to Florence—not that I'm a connaisseuse of such things). And the quotations from the champagne reviews of Robert Mangeot's character were absolutely hilarious. I was reminded of a review I once read in The Sydney Herald which described a particularly robust red wine as having "a sweaty saddle taste." I've never forgotten that one! Many thanks—and warmest congratulations—for another great issue."
— Mary Donaldson-Evans, author of Madame Bovary at the Movies and Medical Examinations

On Other Places (Lowestoft Chronicle's 2015 Anthology)

"Other Places, a mouth-watering feast of short stories, poems, narrative non-fiction, and in-depth interviews, is the latest anthology from the much-admired Lowestoft Chronicle, an eclectic and innovative online journal of new writing focusing on travel and humour. Packed into the pages are stories to entice, enthral, and entertain. Marvel at the inventiveness of Mary Donaldson-Evans's sparklingly witty 'Curious in Corsica: A Tale of Two Couples'…Or be seduced by 'Uprisings at Cap d'Antibes,' Robert Mangeot's acutely observed tale of revolution at a tennis academy in the glittering Cote d'Azur. Litchfield also serves up a tasty blend of pleasing and deftly prepared poems. They include Jay Parini's stirring spiritual poem 'Midrash,' and the wonderfully clever, witty 'Shooing Flies' by David Havird. And if you still aren't sated by this literary banquet, tuck into Litchfield's incisive and enlightening interviews with three critically acclaimed, multitalented writers. Other Places is the perfect holiday destination, offering truly original locations, a cast of unforgettable travellers, some fun-filled outings, and plenty of local colour."
— Pam Norfolk, Lancashire Evening Post

"In the age of tweets and sound bites, it's heartening to read Other Places: Lowestoft Chronicle's 2015 Anthology, a publication celebrating the power and beauty of a story well told."
— Sheldon Russell, author of the Hook Runyon Mystery series

"I really loved the latest anthology from Lowestoft, OTHER PLACES. It's a brilliant, savory, sharp, amusing and varied taste of my favorite magazine, Lowestoft Chronicle. I'm delighted that a place exists for this kind of travel writing — if that's a term for it. And it's not a good one. This is just great writing about place, ranging from the spirit of place to the human spirit. Go anywhere with Lowestoft. And enjoy the trip."
— Jay Parini, bestselling author of The Last Station and The Passages of H.M.

"OTHER PLACES is the usual delightful mix of stories, poems, author interviews, and non-fiction gleaned from the pages of the Lowestoft Chronicle, the only literary magazine I read on a regular basis. Always entertaining and insightful, OTHER PLACES is well worth your time, whether you're a veteran traveler or a hermit like me!"
— James Reasoner, author of the cult classics Texas Wind and Dust Devils

"Armchair travelers, rejoice! Editor Nicholas Litchfield has released Lowestoft Chronicle's anthology for summer 2015, Other Places. Filled with fiction, nonfiction and poetry about travel and destinations, the book brings the far corners of the world to the reader's armchair. The stories and poems vary in tone from dead serious to delightful whimsy, offering something for every taste. Humor, adventure and mystery share the pages with intriguing result. Three author interviews interspersed among the articles add a personal element to the volume, as do the contributor biographies at the back of the book. Each entry reflects a different voice, so a discussion of the book's voice must indicate the variety of perspective and subject matter. The casual reader may not love every entry, but will surely find several to love."
— Mary Beth Magee, Examiner.com (5-Star Review)

"Sick of fly-by journalism and travel dilettantes? The antidote is Lowestoft Chronicle's most recent anthology, Other Places—a collection of essays, stories, and poetry devoted to the in-depth experience of culture. Whether humorous, touching, or revelatory, these expertly curated pieces throw you in contact with the real."
— Scott Dominic Carpenter, author of Theory of Remainders and This Jealous Earth

On Lowestoft Chronicle Issue 20

"Having just perused the latest edition (#20) of the Lowestoft Chronicle, I'm more than ever aware of what an honor it is for me to have found a home for my Corsican story in this sterling literary e-journal. From Raymond Abbott's amusing tale of an ill-conceived attempt to 'say the right thing' after a table companion has confided a personal tragedy, to the black humor of William Quincy Bell's 'Bad Boys Don't Get Dessert,' I savored every word — the fiction and non-fiction, the poetry and prose — of this year-end issue. Ironically, this journal, which opens up the world to readers through the travel pieces, also brought me back into contact with someone I knew in my former, academic life: Scott Carpenter. I thoroughly enjoyed both his delightful account of his struggles with the Danish language and his interview with the editor. It's a small world after all! Nicholas Litchfield is to be congratulated for populating this world with a truly fascinating cast of characters."
— Mary Donaldson-Evans, author of Madame Bovary at the Movies and Medical Examinations

"The Lowestoft Chronicle is unique — an online literary journal with an annual print anthology the focus of whose various genres, verse as well as prose, is travel. As a sometime contributor, I like the company I keep. Of course there's the humor, which has heft even when it's laugh-out-loud funny — case in point, the spot-on exploration of Danish culture, 'Danish as She is Spoke,' by Scott Dominic Carpenter (Winter 2014). But even more than I enjoy the humor, I appreciate the serious skill with which the authors have practiced their craft and value the surprising imaginative stance of this or that storyteller, poet, or essayist to his or her far-flung subject and the put-you-there vividness of the rendering."
— David Havird, poet, author of Map Home

On Somewhere, Sometime... (Lowestoft Chronicle's 2014 Anthology)

"The latest collection of prose and poetry from the Lowestoft Chronicle is a genuine pleasure. Take it with you on your next trip, no matter how far or flung. Nicholas Litchfield has put together something very special, something to celebrate, enjoy, savor."
— Jay Parini, author of the international bestseller The Last Station

"What a lovely book. Well designed, thoughtfully laid out, and with a grand assortment of content. I'm flattered and honored to be in the mix."
— Matthew P. Mayo, Spur Award-winning author of Tucker's Reckoning

"Ever so pleased to have my story, The Exit, included in this great collection of writing about travel and wanderings with a good dash of wit and whimsy. A terrific journal."
— Susan Moorhead, writer, contributor to Somewhere, Sometime…

On Lowestoft Chronicle Issue 17

"The latest issue of the Lowestoft Chronicle is now available. Loosely themed around travel and adventure, this is the only literary magazine I read these days, and it's always enjoyable, a fine blend of short stories, poetry, and essays. Editor Nicholas Litchfield does a fine job with it, and you can check out the new issue here. The magazine's latest print anthology SOMEWHERE, SOMETIME just came out, too, and I'll be reviewing it soon."
— James Reasoner, Rough Edges

"The Spring issue of Lowestoft Chronicle, the excellent online magazine, is now live. Among many promising pieces I'm looking forward to reading is a choice story from one of the finest writers of my acquaintance, Allister Timms. Click on over for good reading."
— Matthew P. Mayo, Spur Award-winning author of Tucker's Reckoning

"I'm proud to announce my unabashed romp 'Uprisings at Cap d'Antibes' is included with other terrific writing in Lowestoft Chronicle #17. It's my second contribution to Lowestoft, after last year's 'La Upsell.' If you're not reading Lowestoft, you should, but only if you love to laugh through far-flung (mis)adventures. Consistently a wonderful read."
— Robert Mangeot, writer, contributor to Mystery Writers of America Presents Ice Cold: Tales of Intrigue from the Cold War, Intrepid Travelers, and Other Places

"My comic short story 'Survival of the Fittest' has recently been published at the Lowestoft Chronicle, a fantastic online literary magazine that mixes humour and travel. Take a read, if you like, and while you're at it, read the whole magazine — there's lots of good fiction there."
— Allister Timms, writer, contributor to Timeshares and Other Places

On Lowestoft Chronicle Issue 16

"I'm always impressed with the quarterly online literary magazine, Lowestoft Chronicle — it's filled with intriguing fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and interviews. So when Nicholas Litchfield, the man behind the Chronicle, emailed me a while ago asking me for an interview, I was honored. Well, the Winter Issue (#16) is now out, and tucked in amongst the pieces of fine writing is that interview with little ol' me. Hope you like it!"
— Matthew P. Mayo, Spur Award-winning author of Tucker's Reckoning

On Intrepid Travelers (Lowestoft Chronicle's 2013 Anthology)

Intrepid Travelers is an exhilarating, uplifting and offbeat journey to the world’s most exciting and exotic locations; a paean to life’s adventurers, those plucky, inspirational souls who travel to enjoy rather than to arrive. Prepare for an adrenalin surge as a thief tries to escape from armed Mafia agents in Hector S. Koburn’s fatalistic ‘Bloody Driving Gloves’…the deadly Evil Bird, Peru’s legendary black-feathered predator, in Michael C. Keith’s unexpectedly moving ‘Pájaro Diablo’…[and] take a definite left-field turn into Steve Gronert Ellerhoff’s brilliantly quirky short story, ‘Apophallation,’ to witness two love rival ‘slugatorium’ research scientists who are slugging it out over a glamorous female chemist. From frank and fascinating interviews…to poetic musings on piano playing, an Ice Age grotto and those terrifying moments of plane take-off, Intrepid Travelers is a coruscating cornucopia of humour, drama and big, beautiful adventures. Don’t miss it!”
— Pam Norfolk, Lancashire Evening Post

"The Lowestoft Chronicle is an on-line literary magazine run by Nicholas Litchfield that publishes fiction, poetry, and non-fiction, usually (but not always) with a travel theme. It branches out from time to time into other areas, such as these interviews with me. Nicholas Litchfield did a great job with them, and I'm glad that the first one has been reprinted in Intrepid Travelers, a fine new anthology showcasing some of the pieces published in the magazine in 2012. There are two more interviews in this volume...[which] are entertaining and informative. I enjoyed the poems in Intrepid Travelers ...[and] the fiction. Some favorites are 'Cracked Windshield' by Tamara Kaye Sellman, a story about a young woman who delivers cars from one side of the country to the other that felt to me like it ought to be the opening chapter of a novel; 'Bloody Driving Gloves' by Hector S. Koburn, a short, potent, noirish crime yarn; and 'The Final Ascent of Hal Tripp' by David Klein, a tale about climbing Mount Everest that strikes a Kilimanjaro-esque note although the plot is very different from the Hemingway story. I really liked the writing in all of these. There's also the supremely silly 'You and I Have Something in Common' by Brian Conlon, which is about a very bizarre job interview. More than anything else, Intrepid Travelers is refreshing. It's well-written, takes the reader to a wide variety of literary destinations, and makes even a confirmed hermit like me want to get up and go somewhere. Highly recommended."
— James Reasoner, Rough Edges

"Who says printed books are dead? Not Lowestoft Chronicle. What a brilliant idea—an online journal publishing a selection of its best fiction, poetry, essays, and interviews in book form and sending readers on a literary world tour that does not have to be powered down during takeoff and landing. Intrepid Travelers is a winner. Long live ink on paper! Long live Lowestoft!"
— Randal S. Brandt, creator of Golden Gate Mysteries and A David Dodge Companion

"I was extremely impressed, after reading it, with the variety and quality of the writing. Each of the works was selected by editor Nicholas Litchfield from the quarterly online literary magazine, the Lowestoft Chronicle, published during 2012. And without a single stinker or filler piece in the bunch, this wonderful 160-page 'little' anthology definitely bids well for the strength of work the online magazine version must regularly publish. There are simply too many works I enjoyed for me to discuss each one in any real detail here, so I'll just say that really liked the poems and short stories by Robert Mangeot, Barth Landor and dl mattila. And I especially liked the creative non-fiction from Denise Thompson-Slaughter and the fascinating interview with the prolific New York Times bestselling author James Reasoner. I think readers and fellow writers will definitely appreciate the essay by Sharleen Jonsson called 'These Are the Days' …[which] chronicles, with insight and humor, each day spent doing all of the things she keeps saying she'll do as soon as there's time—it's really a fantastic piece of writing. There's also a fabulous flash fiction fable by Michael C. Keith called 'Pajaro Diablo' about a Peruvian boy who, thanks to a legendary evil bird, learns an important lesson about death. If you're not completely sold on the anthology yet, at least take a few minutes to visit the website and have a look around, maybe donate a couple bucks if you like what you see. If you're a writer and you have some great travel-themed work, visit the online site and support the magazine by submitting your work and spreading the word to your friends and family. Bottom line: Intrepid Travelers travels well. It's a solid collection of funny and fine travel-themed stories, poetry, essays and interviews that, at 160 pages, easily fits in a back pocket or carry-on bag."
—Frank Mundo, LA Books Examiner, Examiner.com

"Each and every story—fiction and non-fiction, poems and interviews alike—is well written and memorable. The variety of the styles makes this a quick read and one that is easily read on the go. Michael C. Keith's 'Pajaro Diablo' and Hector S. Koburn's 'Bloody Driving Gloves' will haunt me for their deft depictions of pending doom. These are all stories of journeys, either internal, through a quirky job interview or across continents, and each are a delight to read as Lowestoft Chronicle specifically looks out for well-crafted stories involving travel and humor. As a writer, I also found the interviews an extra bonus. It is always fascinating to get a glimpse into the inner thinking of other writers and these three are terrific examples: Randal S. Brandt, Franz Wisner and James Reasoner, all interviewed by Nicholas Litchfield, the Editor of Lowestoft Chronicle."
— Martina Clark, writer, contributor to Far-flung and Foreign

On Lowestoft Chronicle Issue 13

"A new interview with me has been posted on the Lowestoft Chronicle. This one focuses mostly on my Western writing, and you can read it here. Lowestoft Chronicle editor Nicholas Litchfield always asks interesting questions and puts together a fine on-line magazine of fiction, poetry, and writing-related features. Be sure and check out the rest of the contents while you're over there."
— James Reasoner, Rough Edges

On Lowestoft Chronicle Issue 12

"Warmest to you, and good to see your lovely-looking online magazine, which I have been reading this afternoon with pleasure."
— Jay Parini, internationally bestselling author of The Last Station and The Passages of H.M.

"There's a lengthy new interview with me at the online magazine the Lowestoft Chronicle that I think is one of the best I've done. Lots of information about the early days of my writing career (most of which makes me feel about a thousand years old). Take a look at it if you're of a mind to, and while you're there check out the fine fiction and poetry on the site."
— James Reasoner, Rough Edges

"The interview with James Reasoner is a revelation! Reasoner is truly a professional writer, in every sense of the word. Kudos to Lowestoft Chronicle for giving him the attention he deserves."
— Randal S. Brandt, creator of Golden Gate Mysteries and A David Dodge Companion

"I found your interview of James Reasoner fascinating, Nicholas. Since Lyle K. Engel of Book Creations Inc. had his business just five miles from where we live here in Canaan, NY, I am very familiar with their operations and their various Series, some of which, under various names, Mr. Reasoner wrote. What a prolific writer! More in a couple of years than I in a lifetime!"
— Luke Rhinehart, internationally bestselling author of Matari, The Book of est, Long Voyage Back, Adventures of Wim, The Search for the Dice Man, and the cult classic The Dice Man

On Lowestoft Chronicle Issue 11

"Lowestoft Chronicle is about travel, but it's not necessarily a travel log. The characters in the stories, in the poems, are on journeys—journeys in physical space or journeys in the heart and mind. This issue's fiction chronicles traveling with a girlfriend who has Seasonal Affective Disorder, moving to the plains to help build a railroad, taking the upsell on a cruise in Paris, and wandering into a movie set. In the nonfiction section we see the adventure from the other angle: from home."
Newpages.com

"Travel writers, here's a great place for your work. Thanks for including me in the mix, Lowestoft Chronicle."
—Franz Wisner, New York Times bestselling author of Honeymoon with My Brother and How the World Makes Love

On Lowestoft Chronicle Issue 10

"The latest issue of Lowestoft Chronicle contains a fascinating interview with Randal S. Brandt about his discovery of a lost manuscript by the author David Dodge, whose 1952 novel To Catch a Thief was made into a film by Hitchcock in 1955 that's a very early example of postmodern hyper-cool. If you aren't familiar with Lowestoft Chronicle, head on over there. They publish, on a consistent basis, excellent fiction, poetry, and non-fiction."
— Nicholas Rombes, author of Ramones, A Cultural Dictionary of Punk: 1974-1982, and New Punk Cinema

"That's a fine interview with Randal Brandt. I haven't read much of Dodge's work—two or three novels is all—but I have several more on my shelves and will get to them sooner or later. A friend of mine once told me that the problem with writing is that it interferes with your reading time, and that's certainly true!"
— James Reasoner, acclaimed author of the cult classics Texas Wind and Dust Devils

"Lowestoft Chronicle's latest issue, #10, is a good read…many short stories and poems here offer deeper meanings and address heavier topics. There aren't a lot of fiction pieces, but the two that are presented are well written and engaging. The standout piece in this section is ‘Something Like Culture Shock’ by [Dennis] Vanvick. There is humor, most of it slightly sarcastic, but accompanied by good character development and a compelling story. There was only one creative non-fiction piece, but it was extremely well written. 'Political Awakening, 1970' by Denise Thompson-Slaughter…it was refreshing to read a piece with this much depth. While most of the poems are written beautifully, the piece that stands out is 'Practice' by Mark J. Mitchell. The two flash fiction pieces featured here are beautiful, conveying powerful emotion in a short span of time. The piece that stands out, though, is 'Pájaro Diablo' by Michael C. Keith. By the end, the reader is riveted to see what will happen next. The journal also features an interview with Randal S. Brandt, a writer and librarian who is working on a biography of David Dodge, a travel writer and author of To Catch a Thief and The Poor Man’s Guide to Europe…[which] has enough information and material to make for an entertaining read. Overall, this issue is full of great talent and exceptionally written pieces."
— Tara Smith, The Review Review (5-Star Review)

On Far-flung and Foreign (Lowestoft Chronicle's 2012 Anthology)

"Hot off the press, and fresh from the mail, [is] this terrific anthology culled from Lowestoft Chronicle from 2011. The writing here is fresh, surprising, and alive. Not to be missed is the bittersweet interview with the author Augustine Funnell. (Please write more!) The book looks and feels great; I'm proud that my story 'Supernova' is in there rubbing shoulders with the others."
— Nicholas Rombes, author of Ramones, A Cultural Dictionary of Punk: 1974-1982, and New Punk Cinema

On Lowestoft Chronicle Issue 6

"The concept and the layout are wonderful... I've read two or three pieces so far, and—WOW."
— Abby Frucht, acclaimed author of Fruit of the Month (Iowa Short Fiction Award), Licorice, Polly's Ghost, and the New York Times Notable Books of the Year: Life Before Death, Snap, and Are You Mine?

"My two major complaints about numerous online literary magazines are…they are so confusing and disorganized…stories are boring and the poetry is derivative and lacking in creativity. I am happy to say that this young journal manages to avoid these pitfalls. Lowestoft Chronicle's website is nicely laid out and there is wide variation of reading material. This is an eclectic journal which stresses that it likes humorous pieces with an emphasis on travel, hence many of the works take one to far-away and exotic places."
Newpages.com

On Lowestoft Chronicle 2011 Anthology

"This is a fine anthology that I found both provocative and enjoyable. Highest praise: it made me want to write short stories again."
 — Luke Rhinehart, internationally bestselling author of The Dice Man, Matari, The Book of est, Long Voyage Back, Adventures of Wim, The Search for the Dice Man, and The Book of the Die

On Lowestoft Chronicle Issue 4

"Go ahead, read it right now. I'll wait… Fun, huh? Thought it might pep up your midweek. All things considered, it might just be a very good thing if the Lowestoft Chronicle were to achieve their goal of world domination. Best wishes to them!"
— Cheryl LaGuardia, E-Views, Library Journal

 
 
ISSN 2160-4274. Copyright © 2009 - 2017 Lowestoft Chronicle